Posts

Expanding our concepts of the quality of everyday travelling with flow theory.

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In our new paper "Have a good trip! Expanding our concepts of the quality of everyday travelling with flow theory", we explore how flow theory could enrich and deepen our understanding of the positive value of travel/being on the move. Flow is an experience that occurs when a person is fully immersed in doing something that provides, level of challenge enough to keep the person concentrated, avoiding boredom or distraction. This experience is profoundly enjoyable, even if mundane, and valuable in its own right.    Here is a nice video by FightMediocrity summarizing flow theory in 5 minutes. And Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi talking about flow in a TED Talk.     In our paper, we conclude that:  Most modes offer the potential for experiencing flow in different degrees by triggering mental states of awareness, increased creativity, concentration, disregard for the sense of self, and slowing down on time.  Everyday travelling offers rich challenges and feedback mechanisms that indiv

The societal dimension of the automated vehicles transition: Towards a research agenda

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Automated vehicles (AVs) are often presented by popular media, automotive and technology companies as an inevitable reality of the near future associated with a positive revolution in individual mobility (e.g. increased road safety, reduced congestion, less travel time cost). However, thus far, research has focused predominantly on technical and operational aspects as well as on short-term implications (e.g. traffic flow) of the automated vehicles transition. An introduction of AVs driven solely by the technology and business development might ignore the socio-technical nature of the transport system and thus be in conflict with planning objectives such as the promotion of public and non-motorized transport, the reduction of negative externalities of motorized transport and the development of a healthy and socially inclusive transport system. Our new paper presents a research agenda on the societal dimension of the AVs transition. We identify key research shifts from the mainstream tra

100 Social Sciences and Humanities priority research questions for transport and mobility in Horizon Europe

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Natural and technical sciences were funded 770% higher than social sciences and humanities (SSH) for climate change related issues between 1990 and 2018 at a global level. Social science research on climate change mitigation in particular, received only 0.12% of all funding during the same period (Overland & Sovacool, 2020). However, responding to climate emergency will require fundamental changes at individual and societal level (i.e. attitudes, norms, incentives, politics), which are the main focus of social science research (e.g. anthropology, economics, education, international relations, human geography, development studies, legal studies, media studies, political science, psychology, and sociology). The misallocation of funding regarding social sciences and humanities is also reflected in the transport field, which is one of the main contributors to climate change. Together with 23 SSH experts on transport and mobility from across Europe, encompassing diverse SSH disciplines,

Is micro-mobility sustainable?

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Is micro-mobility (MM) sustainable? In our new book chapter in the Handbook of Sustainable Transport (edited by Carey Curtis) we provide an overview of MM implications for accessibility, air pollution, safety, physical activity and subjective wellbeing. We conclude that MM sustainability potential should not be automatically assumed and could vary among the different MM modes. We suggest a set of regulatory actions with regards to permission, operation and monitoring of MM systems that could enhance their social sustainability.  Abstract: This chapter first defines and then explores the social sustainability potential of MM by providing an overview of MM implications for accessibility, air pollution, safety, physical activity and subjective wellbeing. Our results show that MM could enhance accessibility, yet costs, physical ability and technical skills might exclude certain social groups from using such modes. MM modes have no or limited direct CO2 emissions but environm

New edited volume: Policy implications of autonomous vehicles

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Our new edited volume “Policy Implications of Autonomous Vehicles”, Volume Five in the Advances in Transport Policy and Planning series systematically reviews policy relevant implications of AVs and the associated possible policy responses, and discusses future avenues for policy making and research. It comprises 13 cha pters discussing: (a) short-term implications of AVs for traffic flow, human-automated bus systems interaction, cyber-security and safety, cybersecurity certification and auditing, non-commuting journeys; (b) long-term implications of AVs for carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and energy, health and well-being, data protection, ethics, governance; (c) implications of AVs for the maritime industry and urban deliveries; and (d) overall synthesis and conclusions. Many thanks for the great collaboration to my co-editors (Dr. Nikolas Thomopoulos and Professor Bert van Wee) and the authors of the chapters listed below, who contributed their expertise within each field making this

Implications of vehicle automation for accessibility and social inclusion of people on low income, people with physical and sensory disabilities, and older people

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Vehicle automation and vehicle sharing are frequently presented as key factors towards a more inclusive transport system.  In our new book chapter, we argue that we should not take this statement for granted. We suggest that the requirements for digital access and online payment for those services, vehicle custom-design, operating complexities, and uncertainties, insecurity and distrust in adoption of new vehicle technologies could compromise possible accessibility gains and thus negatively influence social inclusion levels of people on low income, people with physical and sensory disabilities, and older people.  Book chapter available here .  Many thanks for the nice collaboration to my co-author Bert Van Wee and the editors of the book volume “Demand for Emerging Transportation Systems. Modeling Adoption, Satisfaction and Mobility Patterns” Constantinos Antoniou, Dimitrios Efthymiou, Emmanouil Chaniotakis  Abstract  We analyze the implications of vehicle

Questioning mobility as a service: Unanticipated implications for society and governance

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IIn our new paper in Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice (available open access here ), we explore:  -To what extent can the MaaS promises (to citizens and cities) be delivered? -What are the unanticipated societal implications of MaaS for wellbeing, emissions and social inclusion? -What are the possible governance responses in case of MaaS mass adoption? We conclude that: -The dominant MaaS rhetoric advances a promise of freedom to users that cannot be delivered. -There are equity implications associated with various unanticipated consequences and these require mitigation. -Promises of ‘efficiency’ are not possible without government intervention. Great collaboration with Kate Pangbourne, Miloš N Mladenović, and Dominic Stead. Abstract In this paper we focus on the development of a new service model for accessing transport, namely Mobility as a Service (MaaS) and present one of the first critical analyses of the rhetoric surrounding the concept. One central assum