Is micro-mobility sustainable?

Is micro-mobility (MM) sustainable? In our new book chapter in the Handbook of Sustainable Transport (edited by Carey Curtis) we provide an overview of MM implications for accessibility, air pollution, safety, physical activity and subjective wellbeing.

We conclude that MM sustainability potential should not be automatically assumed and could vary among the different MM modes. We suggest a set of regulatory actions with regards to permission, operation and monitoring of MM systems that could enhance their social sustainability. 

Abstract: This chapter first defines and then explores the social sustainability potential of MM by providing an overview of MM implications for accessibility, air pollution, safety, physical activity and subjective wellbeing. Our results show that MM could enhance accessibility, yet costs, physical ability and technical skills might exclude certain social groups from using such modes. MM modes have no or limited direct CO2 emissions but environmental effects are uncertain if we account for the production of these modes. Road safety could be enhanced due to mutual awareness stimulation, but also compromised due to speed differential between MM and other modes. Physical activity could be increased or reduced depending on whether MM modes are electric or not. Exercising, enjoying the scenery, and having fun could enhance subjective well-being of MM mode users, while perceived safety risk could negatively influence subjective well-being. We conclude that MM sustainability potential should not be automatically assumed and could vary among the different MM modes.

Book chapter preprint available here 


 

 

 

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